Tag Archives: Infrastructure

Construction of 134 km Habela-Cheatat Strategic Road Progressing Well

First phase construction of the 134 km long strategic road connecting Zoba Maekel to Gash Barka direct is progressing well and on schedule.

BY SHABAIT

The first phase of construction of the Habela-Cheatat strategic road is progressing well and on schedule. The report was made by Eng. Samson Tesfay, Coordinator of the project. Continue reading Construction of 134 km Habela-Cheatat Strategic Road Progressing Well

Eritrea: Renovation and Expansion of Major Roads

The development of road networks is considered as the prime index of economic growth and development of a country.

BY MIRIAM TEKESTE | SHABAIT

The Eritrean government is engaged in the maintenance and expansion of roads and building bridges. The first phase of the renovation and expansion of the economically important [strategic] roads that started in 2018 is in full swing. Continue reading Eritrea: Renovation and Expansion of Major Roads

Poorly Constructed Addis Ababa Roads Falling Apart

By Balambaras,

FINANCED with borrowed money, poorly constructed Addis Ababa roads are falling apart and causing too many accidents.

Since Addis Ababa has been a testimony of Chinese government financed road network experiments in Africa, is this how they all end up in a couple of years? Continue reading Poorly Constructed Addis Ababa Roads Falling Apart

African Economic Outlook 2014: Eritrea’s Monetary and Debt Policy

Full liberalization of the foreign-currency regime, building broad partnerships and multiple pathways to tap different financial sources could unlock the foreign-currency shortages and exchange-rate overvaluation that will induce private investment, hence boost growth and create employment in the country.

By Magidu Nyende and Luka Okumu,

ERITREA’S monetary policy has mainly been geared to accommodating the public fiscal deficits.

Broad money supply increased sharply to 119% of GDP in 2011 and 2012. Due to exceptionally high deficits in the previous years, the authorities had to resort to central-bank financing. Credit supply to the private sector grew at much lower rates, between 1% and 4%, over 2009-11.  Continue reading African Economic Outlook 2014: Eritrea’s Monetary and Debt Policy

African Economic Outlook 2014: Eritrea’s Fiscal Policy

The Eritrean government has continued to prioritize infrastructure development in order to promote private-sector investments. Infrastructure projects in Massawa and Assab have been completed. The country is also expanding the road network, particularly in the mining sites and in the free-trade zone, as well as the housing sector in Asmara. (AfDB Eritrea Report)

By Magidu Nyende and Luka Okumu,

EVIDENCE-based assessment of fiscal policy in Eritrea is severely constrained by lack of transparency and availability of basic information on fiscal operations and management, including, of course, the budget.

Estimates by various sources, including the IMF, however, indicate a continued improvement in the overall fiscal deficit (after grants) from about 13.2% of GDP in 2011 to an estimated 10.3% in 2013, reflecting improved tax collection from the 2012 level, lower expenditure on safety nets and a contraction in public investment (see table below).  Continue reading African Economic Outlook 2014: Eritrea’s Fiscal Policy

Eritrea’s Electric Power Challenges

Eritrea’s challenges to energy security is related to its low national income, challenging physical terrain, and post-war infrastructural destruction. Despite all that, 35% of Eritrean population have access to electricity. By comparison, figures across the East African region shows Ethiopia at 23%, Kenya at 18%, Uganda at 8.5%, and Sudan at 36%

By Berhane Woldu,

AT a conference in Asmara, a person in the audience got up and decried the fact that there is acute power problem. The person’s concern was that the City of Asmara was becoming prone to blackouts, the inconveniences of the shortage of light and the use of surfing the internet. I was taken aback by the question and had wanted the person to sit down; but being rational and on topic was the way out. It means that recognizing that the question of power isn’t a moral issue. It is financial, environmental and technical.  Continue reading Eritrea’s Electric Power Challenges