Tag Archives: US-Africa Summit

The Eritrean Experience: The First Step in the Long March to African Renaissance

One thing we have noticed from Obama's troubling dinner party is that Africa's most admirable and revolutionary leaders who uphold their public trust and sacrificed their youth for the common good of their people have to compete with some of Africa's finest and nastiest tyrants, torturers and autocrats in order to be heard or noticed. The fact of the matter is, Africans are the only people that can save Africa from its present day malaise.
One thing we have noticed from Obama’s troubling dinner party is that Africa’s most admirable and revolutionary leaders who uphold their public trust and sacrificed their youth for the common good of their people have to compete with some of Africa’s finest and nastiest tyrants, torturers and autocrats in order to be heard or noticed. The fact of the matter is, Africans are the only people that can save Africa from its present day malaise.

By Hilal,

IT is customary to see African summits being held in different parts of the world. All of these summits are designed to safeguard the economic and national security interests of the sponsors and not of Africa and Africans.

They are often described as a gathering place of tyrants, dictators and genociders. A Kodak Moment of Shame saturated by photo ops, condescending lectures and wining and dining till the wee hours of the morning thanks to their hosts’ deep pockets.

Most of the African nations got their independence in the sixties. With a lot of hoopla and fanfare, constitutions were drafted and government structures were designed overnight. They were the exact replicas of their colonizers and no effort was done to include the African subjective and objective realities of the newly created nations.

Puppets and stooges of the colonizers were hand picked to fill all the government posts and institutions formed to run the new nations. They were selected to make certain that the interests’ of their masters were protected and not their nations’ and peoples’ interests. Those brave souls, who uphold the public trust and worked for the common good and their peoples’ and nations’ interests were summarily liquidated.  Continue reading The Eritrean Experience: The First Step in the Long March to African Renaissance

President Isaias of Eritrea Won’t Be Missing Much

The U.S.- African Leaders Summit has already breaks too many international protocol traditions: The date was chosen to coincide with Obama’s Birth day; all leaders will undergo Ebola virus screening in advance; Obama talks, they listen, no final document after the summit; no one-on-one meeeting with Obama; Dinner will be hosted by a cabinet secretary than by Obama himself; etc… Besides the free dinner, what is going to be the utility of the African leader’s trip to this summit then? It is going to be judged by the results to come anyways

By Bereket Kidane,

THE West has always treated African leaders like children. They always talk down to them. They don’t show them the respect that is shown to heads of state from other parts of the world.

In keeping with past practice of slights and departure from protocol, the Obama White House announced this weekend that every African leader that has received an invite for the White House Summit will be tested for the Ebola Virus without exception. How demeaning and disrespectful is that? Continue reading President Isaias of Eritrea Won’t Be Missing Much

Guests from Africa at the Dinner Table

According to the White House, the Summit will focus on the advancement of trade and investment in Africa, and America’s commitment to Africa’s security and its democratic development. But that can be achieved only through meaningful partnership and inclusion and not with exclusion.

By Samuel Mahaffy (PhD),

IN many communities in Africa, it is a tradition to welcome a visiting guest with a meal.  Sharing a meal is a way of building and affirming relationship.

The U.S. – Africa Leaders Summit, hosted by the White House this week, affords the United States the opportunity to welcome 51 Heads of State and senior leaders from Africa. This unprecedented event should be an opening for the United States to change course in its engagement with the nations on the African continent.  Continue reading Guests from Africa at the Dinner Table